Consultant for Endline and Final Performance Evaluation

1.    Background:

Indonesia is one of the most disaster-prone countries  and is constantly beset by natural hazards that include rapid onset events such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcano eruptions, flooding, landslides, and slow onset El Nino/La Nina-induced drought and peatland fires. These events shape and influence many aspects of the nation because of their relative frequency, and uncertainty; and the substantial and cumulative socio-economic impact they cause.. Disasters in Indonesia have profound consequences, leading to loss of life, hardship, and widespread suffering among individuals. Vulnerable groups, in particular, bear disproportionately negative effects. The impact extends beyond immediate human suffering, encompassing significant social and economic repercussions. Disruption to essential services, coupled with the loss and damage to infrastructure and property, as well as crop failure and the loss of access to markets, amplifies the direct consequences of the event. Importantly, these repercussions can persist for years, exerting a lasting influence on livelihoods, health, and the overall well-being of the affected communities. Disasters can impose prolonged setbacks on development. It is estimated that drought-driven peat fires in 2015 cost Indonesia more than 16 billion USD.

Based on the Indonesia Disaster Information Data (DIBI), the trend of disasters in Indonesia shows an increasing number of hazardous events. In the last 2 decades (2001-2020), Indonesia recorded 33,412 hazardous events that killed 191,529 people and destroyed or damaged more than 2.7 million houses. Almost 90% of hazardous events in Indonesia are hydro-meteorological while 10% are geophysical. In 2022, Indonesia recorded 3,544 hazardous events, and 2,897 from January, 1, to September 18, 2023. The Ministry of Finance estimates that the government spent around 1.6 billion USD on disaster relief and reconstruction in 2022. This includes the cost of providing food, shelter, and medical care to disaster victims, as well as the cost of rebuilding damaged infrastructure.  For a country with the disaster risk profile of Indonesia, having the capacity to recruit, train, and sustain a Disaster Risk Management workforce is critical to achieving self-reliance and effectively using budget resources to respond to and recover from the impact of disasters.

Workforce development is crucial to ensure effectiveness in both Public and Private sector organizations in Indonesia and remains a critical priority in the GOI’s current mid-term development plans.  Also, bureaucratic reform is restructuring government agencies, eliminating many Echelon III (managers) and IV (supervisor) positional categories, and replacing them with functional positions.  The need for professionalizing the workforce, as part of bureaucratic reform planning and development, is also a top priority within the Government of Indonesia’s disaster management agency, the Badan Nasional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB), and provincial and regency disaster management offices, Badan Penanggulangan Bencana Daerah (BPBDs).

BNPB and the BPBDs were established by the Government of Indonesia in 2007. Over the years, these agencies have undergone gradual expansion. A notable aspect is that many individuals involved in Disaster Risk Management (DRM) within these agencies are often seconded from other line ministries. It’s common for these personnel to possess limited experience in DRM, and staff rotations are frequent, underscoring the necessity for well-established and effective workforce training and capacity building. Such initiatives are crucial to empower staff with the skills and knowledge required to effectively fulfill their responsibilities in disaster management The change to Functional positions also requires a clear understanding of the minimum job qualifications and competencies that staff must have or quickly gain to become effective in their roles.

The approach INVEST DM 2.0 takes is “Building an enabling environment for Capacity Building and Self-Reliance” to enable the GOI and BNPB to recruit, train, sustain, and replace a continual stream of qualified staff to lead the GOI’s DRM efforts (prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery).

Investing in Human Capital for Disaster Management (INVEST DM 2.0) is a bilateral cooperation program between the Government of Indonesia (GOI) and the Government of the United States of America (USG) through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) via the National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB).  INVEST DM 2.0 was designed as a follow-up of the Technical Assistance and Training Team (TATTs) program supported by USAID/BHA from 2014 to 2019 and continuity of the first phase of INVEST DM that was implemented from May 2019 until Jan 2021[1]. This nationally focused program and iterations are expected to be implemented at the regional level. The program directly supports the BNPB in building human resource capabilities (bureaucracy reform and capacity enhancement) in disaster management at a national level through training and education initiatives as well as improving the system and its strategies. These initiatives are expected to strengthen regional DM institutions and people at key administrative levels. They will be better prepared and able to fulfill their mandates to deliver effective and lifesaving DM services.

The INVEST DM 2.0 program focuses on improving the ability of people to manage disasters and is one of seven development agenda items in the National Medium Term of Development Plan (RPJMN) for 2020-2024. Working together with BNPB technical units, the INVEST DM 2.0 program aims to contribute to four of the six BNPB policy directions and strategies for 2020-2024.  They include (a) improvement of reliable, innovative, collaborative, and implementable DM systems and strategies; (b) improvement of the preparedness of central and regional governments, business institutions, communities, academia, and the mainstream media in a coordinated manner in dealing with disasters; (c) improvement of emergency response that is fast, precise and coordinated; and (d) strengthening governance and professionalism in disaster management.

The INVEST DM 2.0 program works with BNPB counterparts and its technical units to deliver advisory support and technical assistance. It is tailored to research, improve and/or support the establishment, implementation, and measurement of organizational development initiatives. This will increase the skills and professionalize the workforce to achieve a high-performance culture. This is being achieved through supporting BNPB’s reformation agenda for organizational development and change management for civil servants by:

  1. Contributing to the organizational capacity development of BNPB’s Education and Training Center (Pusdiklat).
  2. Assisting the General Affairs and Human Resources Bureau with targeted workforce planning and development initiatives to improve overall personnel management.
  3. Facilitating the Pusdalops (EoC) to advance reforms in emergency operation systems and improve coordination of data management and communication.
  4. Policy and planning support to the Systems and Strategy department (DSS) to advance BNPB’s evolving policy initiatives that improve subnational BPBD lifesaving and preparedness service delivery.

The Theory of Change of the program posits:

IF BNPB, as the national authority in Indonesia responsible for managing disasters and risk, has effective structures, systems, and policies in place to prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters;

AND IF BNPB has a capacitated workforce equipped with the necessary technical knowledge and tools to realize those structures, systems, and policies, and commits to continuous learning and quality assurance;

AND IF learnings from the sub-national level are utilized at the national level to ensure BNPB is meeting the needs of communities;

THEN BNPB will better mitigate, prepare, and respond to disasters, save lives, and lay the foundation for quick and effective recovery;

BECAUSE durable and targeted education and training investments, augmented with organizational reforms that strengthen people management, well-functioning organizational structures and systems, that are rooted in better capacity at assessing risk, and supported by the requisite interoperable and public outreach systems, will capacitate BNPB to fulfill its national DM mandate.

Key assumptions underpinning this ToC are:

·      INVEST DM’s focus is on one of BNPB’s mandates on the provision of human capital development, assuming that increased capacity of human capital (people) will lead to improvement of BNPB.

 

The INVEST DM 2.0 program has an overarching goal and a purpose, supported by 2 Sub-purposes, 4 Intermediate Outcomes, 24 Outputs, 189 activities, and 36 indicators with the following highlights:

GOAL: Government of Indonesia’s disaster management institutions have a whole-society approach on disaster management to fulfill their mandate to deliver effective DM services and save lives.
Purpose: Improve BNPB’s human capital and organizational systems needed to effectively manage disaster impact and risk.
Sub-Purpose 1:

Human resource capacity within the National Disaster Management Board (BNPB) is strengthened through education, training (in-service and pre-service) and fulfilling core competency through institutionalizing workforce planning and development in disaster management.

Sub-Purpose 2:

BNPB has increased capacity to adopt and manage new initiatives.

 

 

 

Intermediate Outcome 1:

The Organizational capacity of Pusdiklat is strengthened and its service delivery is accelerated by developing and implementing appropriate Disaster Management (DM) certified in-service training and pre-service education pathways for the workforce across BNPB, Sub-national DM Institutions, and other Government of Indonesia (GOI) agencies.

Intermediate Outcome 3:

BNPB has established and strengthened the National Emergency Operation Center (EOC) systems and strategies to capacitate its workforce and to develop cross-linkage with relevant working units such as Pusdatinkom (Center for Disaster Management Data, Information, and Communication and Deputy of Emergency Response).

Output 1.1:  Pusdiklat has the capacity to implement online training.

Output 1.2: Pusdiklat has implemented the training providers accreditation mechanism

Output 1.3: Pusdiklat has developed a disaster learning mechanism

Output 1.4: LSP-PB has a strategic plan and is functioning as a professional certification board.

Output 1.5: Technical cooperation for exchanges, learnings and linkages with external education and training providers is strengthened (FEMA/EMI, US DOD, NDPTC, Texas A&M, CDP).

Output 1.6: Pusdiklat has capacity to implement the recommendations of the stocktaking analysis and (Polytechnic DM establishment) roadmap of pre-service (diploma) civil servant entry-level study programs

Output 1.7: Pusdiklat has effective training management

 

Output 3.1: Functioning mechanism (Norms, Standards, Procedures & Criterion (NSPK) – policies and procedures) of Pusdalop roles and functions.

Output 3.2: Pusdalop (EOC) BNPB workforce capacity is improved to support its roles and functions (integrated into Output 2.2).

Output 3.3: Pusdalop has capacity to support the sub-national offices.

Output 3.4: Pusdatinkom has operationalized an integrated and interoperable information system

Output 3.5: Pusdalops has developed its future direction and plan.

Output 3.6: Integrated emergency response system establishment.

Intermediate Outcome 2:

BNPB has the capacity to create and manage workforce planning and development through the implementation of the Human Capital Development Plan (HCDP).

Intermediate Outcome 4:

BNBP has the capacity to develop effective systems and strategies to support the sub-national government to implement Minimum Service Standards (MSS) on DM.

Output 2.1: BNPB has a recruitment and retention plan that meets functional and structural positions’ needs and competencies

Output 2.2: BNPB is supported to implement a plan for lifelong learning and continuous professional development of its workforce.

Output 2.3: BNPB has an integrated system and data to control and manage the performance of employees (including the feedback and complaints handling mechanism for HRM transparency and accountability improvement

Output 2.4: BNPB is supported to implement and monitor the gender and disability inclusion plan (policies, procedures and practices).

Output 4.1:  BNPB risk assessment experts roster mechanism is implemented and improved.

Output 4.2:  BNPB has a strategic plan to establish and operationalize the BNPB regional offices.

Output 4.3: BNPB has and implements a mechanism to support the implementation of MSS DM at the sub-national level.

 

The 36-month $4.8 million INVEST DM 2.0 program, funded by USAID BHA, began on May 17, 2021, with a current end date of May 31, 2024. A program midline and midterm performance evaluation has been conducted implementation covering the period of May 17, 2022, to February 28, 2023. Now, with the program’s end date approaching, an end-line assessment and final performance evaluation are needed to identify program results, achievements, and other information for the final performance report.

 

2.    Purpose:

The purpose of this combined end-line assessment and performance evaluation are as follows:

  1. Before-after comparison, compare the INVEST DM 2.0 program’s achievements vis-à-vis its target outcomes and outputs, including an in-depth analysis of cause and effect, approaches to technical training and organizational capacity development; and
  2. Based on findings, lessons learned, key results, and (emergent) impact, provide conclusions with clear justifications as input for program reporting, and/or recommendations for future programming opportunities.

 

3.    Question:

The evaluation type is Performance Evaluation, with the Evaluation Questions will be framed around the key questions[2] below;

  1. Relevance and Coherence: Is the intervention doing the right thing? How well does the intervention fit?
  • How appropriate are the interventions related to the goal/outcome/outputs of INVEST DM 2.0 for BNPB based on their needs/problems? including the changing/dynamics of the political, social, economic, and environmental context.
  • How appropriate is the program in the context of Government Program priorities, current DRM policies, regulations, and laws at the national level, especially in the context of decentralization?
  • How relevant are the targeted BNPB’s work units/technical counterparts? What were the reasons for their selection? Did those units/program participants provide INVEST DM 2.0 with the opportunity to make a positive change?
  • How has management adapted the activity design or implementation based on monitoring information and feedback from the program participants?
  1. Effectiveness: Is the intervention achieving its objectives?
  • To what extent has the program achieved the outputs and strategic objectives as planned (with attention given to where it has exceeded or failed to meet these by investigating what was done right and could have been done better)?
  • What conditions or factors are supporting or undermining the program’s ability to achieve its objectives? And, why?
  • What were the positive and/or negative results and effects of the ‘ ‘program’s interventions on the participants, partners, and stakeholders?
  • Did the assumptions/risks affect the project?
  • Was INVEST DM 2.0’s approach of embedding advisors effective in the short and long term? Was there a better or more effective way of doing business? Did INVEST DM 2.0 select people with the correct knowledge and skills to deliver the planned interventions?
  • What is the emerging evidence of effective BNPB structures, systems, policies, and knowledge improvements/arrangements that promote human capital for mitigation, preparedness planning, and quick and effective response (including logistics) and recovery?
  • How effective is the current USAID and BNPB bilateral partnership arrangement (IA) in achieving the expected results in terms of leveraging GoI resources and creating GoI ownership?
  1. Sustainability: Will the benefits last?
  • To what extent does/did the intervention align and integrate with BNPB’s strategy/policy/services?
  • To what extent and evidence is there of activities/initiatives supported by the program that demonstrate durable transformative change and impact on BNPB’s policies and practice – i.e. business processes and culture, organization change?
  • Will the activity be able to end operations at the close of the award without causing significant disruptions for the targeted program participants?
  • What sustainability mechanisms are in place to ensure that the new or revised strategies, tools, approaches, training, and technical assistance (TA) introduced by the program are been used and sustained? How many and to what extent –  in terms of total #s and % of program-supported initiatives and products been adopted by BNPB?
  • How is the program promoting the uptake and application of outputs? is there evidence of BNPB adoption, uptake, or sustained commitment to institutionalize them into the BNPBs or the subnational government machinery and business processes? How are the commitment and ownership of actors at different levels being fostered?
  • What legacy will the program leave behind in the work units/technical counterparts in BNPB after the program closes?
  • To what extent has the program contributed to laying the groundwork for USAID’s next (post-INVEST DM 2.0) G2G activity?
  • To what extent did the intervention take advantage of other USG and non-USG investments in the same space to facilitate linkages with complementary services, layering with earlier investments, and implementing an exit strategy/ies to minimize the dependency on external support?

 

Key questions for reflection and lessons learned:

  • Unintended Consequences and Lessons Learned: What changes—expected and unexpected, positive and negative—did target program participants/work units/BNPB, and other stakeholders associate with the activity’s interventions? What factors appear to facilitate or inhibit these changes?

Other questions, will be formulated together with INVEST DM 2.0

 

4.    Methodology:

The combined endline assessment and final performance evaluation will follow the three-step process as follows:

Step one: Conduct an endline assessment to measure the organizational and technical performance of selected work units in BNPB against the baseline close to the conclusion of program activity implementation. The end-line assessment should refer to the indicators presented in the INVEST DM 2.0 Indicator Tracking Table (ITT) document.

Step two: Conduct a Final Internal Performance Review (FIPR)  that will ensure that it maintains, as its primary objective, an assessment of performance based on the award’s performance criteria.

 

Step three: Facilitate a pause and reflection workshop that will involve the participants from the INVEST DM 2.0 Team and the counterpart BNPB technical units/directorates, centers, and bureaus.

Step four: Conduct an Evaluation. The results from the end-line assessment, FIPR, and reflection workshop will be used to inform performance evaluation and major achievements against the two key sub-purposes and four intermediate outcomes.

The Evaluator Consultant will be expected to first complete the endline assessment, continued by  conducting the Final Performance Review (FPIR) with all INVEST DM 2.0 Team, then use the results as input for the pause and reflection workshop and performance evaluation by undertaking the following activities:

  • Desk Study and Design of Endline and Performance Evaluation

The Evaluator will have access to and consult the following documentation on the INVEST DM 2.0 program:

  • Grant agreement, program proposal, and modifications
  • Baseline study report
  • Knowledge Retention Survey report
  • Knowledge products such as newsletters, blurbs, and success stories
  • Program and reflection workshop reports
  • Program Implementation/Performance Monitoring Plan
  • Relevant regulations and laws
  • Information sheets and presentations
  • Partner reports
  • Monitoring data (ITT, program participants)
  • Stocktaking and Value for Money study
  • Other relevant INVEST DM studies/assessments generated throughout the implementation

The Evaluator Consultant will be expected to produce a Combined Endline and Performance Evaluation Design document, which will include the methodology and activity schedule, as well as the resources required to deliver the proposed study objectives. In addition, the document should adequately address the evaluation questions agreed upon with the team. The Combined Endline and Performance Evaluation Design should include the data collection and analysis methods and tools to be used, including justification of particular methods chosen that address the constraints, limitations, and biases of the preferred methods. The document shall be informed by referencing program Secondary Data documentation. The document also should include proposed lists of interviewees, interview tools, forms and questions, and a work plan. The Combined Endline and Performance Evaluation Design document will be submitted to the program team for approval, and any subsequent changes made to the document will require re-approval.

  • Data Collection

The following process for the end-line assessment will be:

  1. Develop and test the survey tools, instruments, and FGD questions by an external consultant with review by the INVEST DM 2.0 management team;
  2. Data collection will target each of the counterpart BNPB technical units/directorates, centers, and bureaus) including relevant GOI stakeholder agencies and local government as required as follows: State Administration Agency (LAN), Ministry of State Apparatus and Bureaucracy Reform (KemenPAN-RB), Ministry of Home Affairs (MoHA), Ministry of Environmental and Forestry (MoEF), Commission of State Civil Apparatus (KASN), Agency for National Professional Certification (BNSP), CFE-DM, NDPTC, FEMA, relevant BPBDs and other relevant stakeholders.

The methodology of data collection will be a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. Tools to collect quantitative data will reflect the end-line survey questionnaire. The perception study will collect and analyze qualitative data sets. Qualitative data collection tools should be appropriate, adequate, and cost-effective. Discussion/guiding questions will reflect neutral, non-biased language that is sensitive to the demographics of the target population. All tools used in conducting the evaluation, such as questionnaires, checklists, and discussion guides, will be included in the report as annexes. The key informants of this data collection should, at minimum, include the staff of the targeted departments in BNPB, the staff of the INVEST DM 2.0 partners, etc.

  • Data Analysis

The data analysis applied should include in-depth descriptive analysis, diving into answering/understanding why by utilizing some common framework/theories. It is expected that the analysis will investigate the enabling and disenabling environments for planned outputs and outcomes and where appropriate trends and patterns as well as outliers in the data and conduct appropriate data validation to confirm or dispute findings and interpretations. Additionally, the Evaluator Consultant is expected to conduct validation workshops with the program team on preliminary findings.

Informed by the findings and lessons learned of the above, including references from baseline assessment, end-line assessment, existing monitoring data, and program reports, an in-depth analysis will be conducted to review and capture the end-of-program intermediate outcomes and (emergent) impact.

The analysis will serve to identify and measure changes in BNPB’s capacity – in terms of human capital and competency development, strengthened internal operations and organizational systems, and improved external horizontal and vertical lines of coordination – that can be directly and indirectly attributed to INVEST DM 2.0 interventions. Identified areas of investigation presented and agreed to in consultation with INVEST DM 2.0 leadership. The combined end-line and performance evaluation report findings will be used as the evidence base for program achievements, considering long-term sustainability, and informing future programming strategy.

 

5.    Timeline:

The Endline and Final Performance Evaluation will be conducted from May 1 – May 31, 2024. The period of the performance is for 30 days of intermittent input as described in the consultant activities.

 

6.    Dissemination of Findings:

The findings will be disseminated in the Technical and Management Committee Meeting of USAID-BHA and BNPB.

 

7.    Consultant Activities:

Under this assignment, the selected organization/consultant firm/consultant team, with INVEST DM 2.0 direction shall perform the following activities:

Activities Timeline
1.    Develop a design of combined end-line assessment and performance evaluation, which will include the methodology and activity schedule, including resources required to deliver the proposed study.

The Combined Endline and Final Performance Evaluation Design should include the data collection and analysis methods and tools to be used, including justification of particular methods chosen that address constraints, limitations, and biases of the preferred methods. The document should be informed by program Secondary Data documentation. The document also should include proposed lists of interviewees, interview tools, forms and questions, and a work plan.

3 days
2.    Conduct data collection with a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods.

Data collection will target each of the counterpart BNPB technical units/directorates, centers, and bureaus including relevant GOI stakeholder agencies and local government as required as follows: State Administration Agency (LAN), Ministry of State Apparatus and Bureaucracy Reform (KemenPAN-RB), Ministry of Home Affairs (MoHA), Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MoEF), Commission of State Civil Apparatus (KASN), Agency for National Professional Certification (BNSP), CFE-DM, NDPTC, FEMA, relevant BPBDs and other relevant stakeholders.

9 days
3.    Conduct data analysis that will investigate the enabling and disenabling environment for planned outputs and outcomes and where appropriate trends and patterns as well as outliers in the data and conduct appropriate data validation to confirm or dispute findings and interpretations. Data analysis will also incorporate the results of the knowledge retention survey and the performance evaluation as well as the endline data analysis.

Informed by the findings and lessons learned of the analysis process, including references from baseline assessment, end-line assessment, existing monitoring data and program reports, an in-depth analysis will be conducted to review and capture end-of-program intermediate outcomes and (emergent) impact. The analysis will serve to identify and measure changes in BNPB’s capacity – in terms of human capital knowledge and competency development, strengthened internal operations and systems, and improved external horizontal and vertical lines of coordination – that can be directly and indirectly attributed to INVEST DM 2.0 interventions. Identified areas of investigation presented and agreed to in consultation with INVEST DM 2.0 leadership. The combined end-line and performance evaluation report findings will be used as the evidence base for program achievements, considering long-term sustainability, and informing future programming strategy.

·      Data analysis will be conducted in 5 days

·      Draft version of the end-line study and performance evaluation will be formulated in 3 days

4.    Conduct a validation workshop, which will include facilitating the final internal performance review (FIPR) with the INVEST DM 2.0 Team. The FIPR must include final measurements of all indicators and documentation of the lessons learned from the results of data analysis in combined end-line and final performance evaluation. 1 day
5.    Facilitate the reflection workshop that will involve the participants from the INVEST DM 2.0 Team and the counterpart BNPB technical units/directorates, centers, and bureaus. The selected consultant team must develop the summary result of the reflection workshop for the review of INVEST DM 2.0.

The reflection workshop will share lessons and reflections on (a) context and relevant Indonesia’s DM institutions in the area of technical capacity in human capital and organization development; preparedness-response recovery; policy and planning; and governance; (b) recapitulation of the final status of each outcome, output, and activity implementation; (c) lessons learned (what went/did not well, why); (d) opportunities, challenges, innovation, (timelines, resources, BNPB buy-in/commitment, other internal, external, and political factors, etc.,); and (d) identification of changes and promising/emergent practices.

·       2 days for facilitating the reflection workshop,

·       2 days for the formulation of the summary report

 

6.    Produce the final report of combined end-line and performance evaluation, which will include synthesizing the results of FIPR and reflection workshop. 5 days

Tentative: submission to INVEST DM 2.0 on Week 3 of June 2024

 

 

8.    Consultant Deliverables:

The Consultant team shall deliver to INVEST DM 2.0 the following deliverables:

Deliverable

No.

Description
1 A final combined Endline and Performance Evaluation Design document with all attachments as described in the methodology section
2 Data collection and transcription (secondary and primary data) in sample programmatic target areas as well as conducting data analysis
3 Draft version of the Endline Study and Final Performance Evaluation report, which will include the perception study
4 Presentation of preliminary findings in the Internal Performance Review (FIPR) workshop to the program team, senior management, and other relevant programs within Mercy Corps Indonesia, including the submission of presentation materials and facilitation of the FIPR workshop.
5 Summary report of the reflection workshop that will involve the participants from the INVEST DM 2.0 Program Team and the counterpart BNPB technical units/directorates, centers, and bureaus.
6 Produce up to a maximum of 30 pages, the final report containing the end-line and performance evaluation; excluding the Cover Page, Table of Contents, List of Acronyms, Executive Summary, Annexes, and Attachments.

Both the draft and final version of the Combined Endline and Performance Evaluation Report are written in English and Bahasa Indonesia. The final report must incorporate the results of the summary report of FIPR and the reflection workshop.

 

Report Format

The final Endline and Performance Evaluation report shall not exceed 25 pages; excluding Cover Page, Table of Contents, List of Acronyms, Executive Summary, Annexes, and Attachments. The end-line assessment result should be part of the annex. The final End-line and Performance Evaluation Report shall be structured under the following guidelines:

  1. Cover Page
  2. List of Acronyms
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Executive Summary

Executive Summary should include: a program brief description, a summary of targets and intended objectives or results, areas of meaningful under or over-achievement, major lessons learned, recommendations, and a few lines describing the action plan developed to follow up the end-line survey recommendations and how the end-line survey report will be disseminated. The executive summary should also describe the key findings of the end-line survey.

  1. Methodology

Detailed description of data collection techniques used throughout the end-line survey, methods of selecting key informants, including strengths and weaknesses of methods used; inclusion of stakeholders and staff; rough schedule of activities; description of the data analysis undertaken, including justification and any software packages used. This section should also address the constraints and limitations of the end-line survey process and rigor.

  1. Results and Findings

Findings should be presented as analyzed facts, evidence, and data, with assumptions, clearly documented. Outliers or differences of opinion should be clearly documented and explained. Graphics should facilitate and complement the evidence that supports a specific finding or result and should be easy to read and understand, with proper labeling.

  1. Lessons Learned, Conclusions, and Recommendations

Lessons learned presented in this section must be directly linked back to the information presented in the Results and Findings section of the report. Ideally, items discussed here will not be completely new to the reader – but rather will refer to previous discussions. Conclusions should come with a clear rationale. Recommendations should be action-oriented, practical, and specific, with defined party/parties responsible for the action.

  1. Annexes

The following documents should be included as attachments to the report: the result of the end-line survey; data collection instruments in English; detailed specific questions, lists of participants and stakeholders with number and type of interactions; quantitative or qualitative protocol developed and used. Any data sets (both raw and analyzed) generated from the end-line and evaluation data collection shall be provided in electronic format, including any required photos, participant profiles, or other special documentation.

 

The Consultant will work directly with and report to:

The INVEST DM 2.0 Sr. Knowledge Management, Research, and Communication Specialist, assisted by Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability, and Learning (MEAL) Officer.

 

The Consultant will work closely with:

The INVEST DM 2.0 Chief of Party, Deputy Chief of Party,  Outcome Managers, Senior GEDSI Specialist, Government Relations and Legal/Policy Advisor, Operation Coordinator, Senior Talent Management Officer, BNPB Planning Bureau, BNPB Pusdiklat, BNPB Pusdalops, BNPB Pusdatinkom, BNPB Deputy for System and Strategy, BNPB Human Resource Bureau, BNPB Legal, Organization and Cooperation Bureau, BNPB Deputy Logistics and Equipment and Directorate of refugee facilities and handling.

INVEST DM 2.0 will facilitate communications throughout the contract period and shall actively participate in the coordination, oversight, and implementation of this work. This may include adjustments in implementation as deemed necessary by INVEST DM 2.0.

 

Required Experience & Skills:

The organization/consultant firm/consultant team should have a team member with the following experience and skills:

  • Team Leader with expertise as an evaluator of bilateral/multilateral development programs :
  • Minimum 10+ years of working experience in development programs, with 5+ years of program evaluation experience including program design and management.
  • At least 5 years of professional experience in Institutional Capacity Development, Knowledge Management, Monitoring and Evaluation, Organizational Learning, Evidence-informed Policymaking and Collaborating, Learning, and Adapting (CLA) practices, and Workshop Design.
  • Demonstrable extensive experience producing high-quality evaluations (a sample or summary of a previous evaluation project will be required).
  • Experience working with/evaluating NGO programs funded by USAID/OFDA cooperative agreements is preferred.
  • Preferably has experience working in workforce development, humanitarian, and disaster risk reduction programs, and gender and social inclusion, including experience in facilitating government activities, especially BNPB and USAID Program activities.
  • Familiarity with facilitating hybrid workshops with combined in-person discussions and using a virtual/online platform such as Zoom, Teams, or other online platforms to facilitate knowledge and information exchange.
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills in English, including report writing and editing with the ability to express ideas in the form of reports with excellent quality.
  • Team Member with advanced knowledge of and skills in workforce development within a public agency:
  • Advanced degree in Management, or relevant subjects from a recognized and reputable institution.
  • Minimum of 5 years of demonstrated expertise, skills, and experience working as a workforce development specialist in a governmental organization and leadership experience in national and regional organizations, particularly in humanitarian assistance.
  • Team Member with advanced knowledge and skills in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and/or Disaster Risk Management (DRM) program:
  • Technical expertise in disaster risk management and risk reduction (DRMRR) with significant experience working with government, at national and subnational levels, on technical training and organizational capacity development programs.
  • Familiarity with the DRM context in Indonesia, including legal and regulatory frameworks.
  • Data analyst with advanced skills in analyzing data both quantitative and qualitative:
  • Tested experience in analyzing results from data analysis to identify patterns and recommendations.
  • Demonstrated experience in retrieving data from data application software, checking data validity, and cleaning the data to ensure its accuracy and readiness for analysis.

 

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

Achieving our mission begins with how we build our team and work together. Through our commitment to enriching our organization with people of different origins, beliefs, backgrounds, and ways of thinking, we are better able to leverage the collective power of our teams and solve the world’s most complex challenges. We strive for a culture of trust and respect, where everyone contributes their perspectives and authentic selves, reaches their potential as individuals and teams, and collaborates to do the best work of their lives.

We recognize that diversity and inclusion is a journey, and we are committed to learning, listening, and evolving to become more diverse, equitable, and inclusive than we are today.

 

Equal Employment Opportunity

We are committed to providing an environment of respect and psychological safety where equal employment opportunities are available to all. We do not engage in or tolerate discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender identity, gender expression, religion, age, sexual orientation, national or ethnic origin, disability (including HIV/AIDS status), marital status, military veteran status or any other protected group in the locations where we work.

 

Safeguarding & Ethics

Mercy Corps Indonesia team members are expected to support all efforts toward accountability, specifically to our stakeholders and to international standards guiding international relief and development work, while actively engaging communities as equal partners in the design, monitoring, and evaluation of our field projects. Team members are expected to conduct themselves professionally and respect local laws, customs, and MCI’s policies, procedures, and values at all times and in all in-country venues.

 

How to Apply

Prospective candidates shall email their technical proposal outlining (a) the proposed methodology, work plan, and price offered; (b) CV tenaga ahli yang akan terlibat; (c) portfolio/examples from previous works, to [email protected] with subject “Endline And FinalPerformance Evaluation” before April 15th, 2024. Only candidates who meet the qualifications will be contacted.

 

[1] The INVEST DM term denotes the INVEST program phase 1 (2019-2021), while the term of INVEST DM 2.0 denotes the second phase of INVEST DM program.

[2] BHA Emergency ME Guidance (February, 2022)

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